Untitled
alienfighters:

red-blood meowrails
they fight people a lot

alienfighters:

red-blood meowrails

they fight people a lot

some-wayward-daughter:

onesimus42:

adrateia:

so being a reader is basically a constant struggle between deciding on reading what you bought recently, what you bought ages ago and should stop ignoring, and what you really ought to reread.

And then reading fanfic instead.

The accuracy is incredible

roachpatrol:

HAHAHAHA

*cries*

Aug. 28 5:41 pm
medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School
Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat
Brazil (early 1700s)
Oil on canvas
Philadelphia private collection
[x], [x]
I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:
Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.
Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).
The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.
If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???
How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:
women weren’t artists
Black people weren’t artists
Black people were enslaved
Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”
^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.
If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School

Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat

Brazil (early 1700s)

Oil on canvas

Philadelphia private collection

[x], [x]

I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:

Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.

Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).

The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.

If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???

How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:

  • women weren’t artists
  • Black people weren’t artists
  • Black people were enslaved
  • Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
  • Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
  • white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
  • gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”

^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.

If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

If you think women are crazy you’ve never had a dude go from hitting on you to literally threatening to kill you in the time it takes you to say “no thanks.”

Kendra Wells (via belle-de-nuit)

Well this is fucking surreal

(via kendrawcandraw)

IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED TO RAISE A DISABLED CHILD, OR A TRANS CHILD, OR A GAY OR BI OR PAN CHILD, IF YOU ARE NOT PREPARED TO LOVE AND SUPPORT YOUR CHILD UNCONDITIONALLY, DO NOT HAVE A CHILD.
it is 2014. there are no excuses left. (via callmeoutis)
rayesbrain:

Behold my new life motto

rayesbrain:

Behold my new life motto

Near Kin: A Collection of Words and Art Inspired by Octavia Estelle Butler

samueldelany:

image

Near Kin explores, questions, and pays tribute the multifaceted brilliance of Octavia Butler’s work through poetry, prose and essays by writers all over the world. Among these works are:

There’s the question over a writer’s reasons for self-censorship and what it means to the future of racial survival in Alexis Pauline Gumb’s astounding essay “A Litany for Survivor.” Lenard D. Moore, Wanda Vanhoy Smith, Deborah L. Warner, and Marieta Maglas pay tribute to Butler the writer with their works “Charisma,” “Octavia’s Brood and Vision,” “Identity,” and “Terzenalle for Octavia Estelle Butler.”

Alex Hernandez, Carol Wysinger, M. Justine Gerard, and Meghan Elison take inspiration from Butler’s near/post-apocalyptic life-and-death scenarios in their stories, “A Thing With Soft Bonds,” “In the Beginning,” “Small Talk,” and “Dys-Mytopia.”

Helene Cardona, Charie D La Marr, and Janani Balasubramanian touch on the themes of kinship and motherhood in “The Measure of Death,” “Sweet Autumn, and “My Mother Has Wombs in Her Feet That Will Not Close.”

Linda Ravenswood, Dave Scriven, Joy KMT, Diane Quinones, and Apryl Skies discuss humanity’s violent and indelible interactions with the natural world in “The Saint of the Unknown Universe,” “There is Nothing Inconsistent,” “Autonomous,” “Wisdom’s Path,” and “Immortal Kyn.”

Cacy Fogenie, Soraya Jean-Louise McElroy, Fabiola Jean-Louise, Lance Tooks, Roju, and Marissa Lafferty have contributed amazing paintings and illustrations inspired by Butler’s work: “Justus”, “In A Dream”, “Birth of a Seed”, “Kindred”, “Eternal”, and “Space Lady”

The brilliant Walidah Imarisha has a piece in it, as well.